Holocaust

Selected Lectures (Audio)


“The Holocaust and the Rebirth of Israel” and “A New Era of Jewish History”
1:36
CLAL educational lectures, 1990
from the series Turning Points in Jewish History: Living the Covenant

“Responses to the Holocaust”
1:05
Throughout history, Judaism has responded to tragedy. But the great tragedy in all of Jewish history is the Holocaust. What could possibly constitute a response to the Holocaust? How can Jews respond adequately? Rabbi Greenberg provocatively suggests that we should expect unprecedented innovative responses. The fundamental existence of the Jewish people is at stake.

“The Holocaust: Tragedy and the Search for Meaning”
:53
An unprecedented catastrophe in Jewish history, the Holocaust poses radical challenges to traditional Judaism. Approximately half of the Jews killed in the Holocaust were traditionally observant. Approximately one million children were murdered. Can we explain the Holocaust? Was it a result of our sins? Are there any ways to make sense of such immense tragedy?

“Impact of the Holocaust”
1:12
Rabbi Greenberg explores questions posed by the tragedy of the Holocaust and potential responses.

“Yom HaShoah”
1:01
How can we commemorate the unprecedented tragedy of the Holocaust? Rabbi Greenberg contends that any Holocaust commemoration must cultivate a deep sense of human responsibility.

“The Holocaust and Pluralism”
1:48
Rabbi Greenberg explains the impact of the Holocaust on his theology. He movingly describes his shift from being an Orthodox traditionalist to a pluralist who embraces all Jews.
At approximately 1:05, the speaker changes from Rabbi Greenberg to a Holocaust survivor.

“The Holocaust and an Individual Religious Response”
1:34
Rabbi Greenberg shares the impact of the Holocaust on his personal religious life.
The first ten minutes of this lecture are another speaker; Rabbi Greenberg begins to speak approximately ten minutes in.

“Religion and the Ethical Implications of the Holocaust”
1:27
Rabbi Greenberg discusses the ethical and religious implication of the Holocaust and how through the event we see the potential concentrations of power in the twenty-first century.

“Holocaust Theology”
1:32
An exploration of the tension between the fundamental Jewish belief of redemption and the reality of the Holocaust.

“Personal Impact: the Holocaust and Pluralism”
1:31
An exploration of the effect the Holocaust has had on Rabbi Greenberg’s religious pluralism.